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Five Sites Indie Publishers Should Follow…But Probably Don’t

INGENTA  Based in the UK, this site offers NA-based indies a different perspective. I highly recommend the blog articles. PUBLISHERSLUNCH I was a paying member here for a while. It was worth it. Lots of insider information about who was getting deals in the traditional pub world, new technologies, and trends. The insights are often good predictors of what’s coming down the road for indie publishers. MEDIABISTRO It’s not just a fantastic site for media-related job listings. Mediabistro offers great…

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Why an Online Presence is Essential to Your Book Sales

“Social media is very important, as is author branding. More and more readers choose based not just on a book, but because they have gotten to know an author “personally”. — Gwen Gades, owner of Dragon Moon Press in Alberta, Canada Book sales are no easy thing to achieve in today’s market. Even the most riveting stories, polished by the best editors and proofreaders can fade into oblivion soon after they’re released. Reviews help, but it’s difficult to get enough…

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“Self-Published Authors Are Destroying Literature” and Other Opinions

Is self-publishing destroying literature? Hardly, but the debate about self-publishing (which I’m using as a blanket term to describe indie publishing, independent publishers, author / publishers, vanity publishing and subsidy publishing and any other name used to refer to someone who is publishing via non-traditional routes) has been blowing up online forms since the late 1990s, and real-life writers’ group discussions long before that. Although the reading public is beginning to accept self-published books (more so in some genres than…

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Editors Are Not As Evil As You Might Think. Honest!

Even industry icons such as Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe had an editor: His name was Maxwell Perkins. He’s credited with being a significant influence in the success of The Great Gatsby. “Thou shalt commit adultery.” That “commandment” was printed in a Bible in 1631. The publishers, Robert Barker and Martin Lucas, were heavily fined and lost their printing license as a result. Still referred to as the Wicked Bible, the few copies that are still in…

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Best Selling Author Pam Crooks Talks About Her Move From Traditional to Self-Publishing

” Have the best product you can make. Same goes with  traditional publishing. Learn, write, revise and then repeat. Make it your mantra.“ When did you publish your first book? Pam Crooks: My first book was released by Dorchester Publishing in 2001. That book was Wyoming Wildflower, which is still my mother’s favorite. How long did it take you to find a publisher who would work with you? Pam Crooks: Forever, it seems. But all told, it was nine years…

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Essential Information for Formatting Your Book Cover

Your book cover is the first thing people see.  And few things lose self-publishers more sales than advertising that it’s an amateur project. As the late Dan Poynter used to say, a book cover shouldn’t look like it’s made with “loving hands at home.” Layout, font choice, spacing, and images must be chosen carefully and work well together to entice— potential fans — to click. The formatted book cover files you supply must be created properly, or you’re going to…

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The Top 5 Questions I Am Asked About Book Design

1. Why shouldn’t I lay my book out in Word? Word is a word processing program, not designed to format files for press. There are lots of issues that can and do occur when you use Word to lay out a print project: Sometimes the black text is only at about 90% when printed, so you’re essentially getting a dark gray. Word does not work in CMYK colors, which are necessary for printed books. It works in RGB colors, which…

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Color Management & Book Covers

Color is tricky at the best of times. If you want exact color management for your book cover design (such as a particular shade of blue for a university logo), you really should use something called spot color. Spot colors are specially mixed ink colors. Like the paint you purchase for your walls, spot colors, or Pantone Matching System (PMS) colors, are mixed according to predetermined recipes. Each color in the PMS spectrum has an assigned number. When a client…

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